IZA

Logo
Does Education Matter for Economic Growth?
by Michael S. Delgado, Daniel J. Henderson, Christopher F. Parmeter
(December 2012)
published in: Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, 2014, 76 (3), 334-359

Abstract:
Empirical growth regressions typically include mean years of schooling as a proxy for human capital. However, empirical research often finds that the sign and significance of schooling depends on the sample of observations or the specification of the model. We use a nonparametric local-linear regression estimator and a nonparametric variable relevance test to conduct a rigorous and systematic search for significance of mean years of schooling by examining five of the most comprehensive schooling databases. Contrary to a few recent papers that have identified significant nonlinearities between education and growth, our results suggest that mean years of schooling is not a statistically relevant variable in growth regressions. However, we do find evidence (within a cross-sectional framework), that educational achievement, measured by mean test scores, may provide a more reliable measure of human capital than mean years of schooling.
Text: See Discussion Paper No. 7089