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Markets for Reputation: Evidence on Quality and Quantity in Academe
by Daniel S. Hamermesh, Gerard A. Pfann
(December 2009)
published as 'Reputation and Earnings: The Roles of Quality and Quantity in Academe' in: Economic Inquiry, 2012, 50 (1), 1 - 16

Abstract:
We develop a theory of the market for individual reputation, an indicator of regard by oneís peers and others. The central questions are: 1) Does the quantity of exposures raise reputation independent of their quality? and 2) Assuming that overall quality matters for reputation, does the quality of an individualís most important exposure have an extra effect on reputation? Using evidence for academic economists, we find that, conditional on its impact, the quantity of output has no or even a negative effect on each of a number of proxies for reputation, and very little evidence that a scholar's most influential work provides any extra enhancement of reputation. Quality ranking matters more than absolute quality. Data on mobility and salaries show, on the contrary, substantial positive effects of quantity, independent of quality. We test various explanations for the differences between the determinants of reputation and salary.
Text: See Discussion Paper No. 4610