Francesco Devicienti
Research Fellow

IZA Logo
     
Devicienti Francesco Devicienti is associate professor of economics at the University of Torino (Italy), Department of Economics and Statistics, and research affiliate of the Collegio Carlo Alberto. He has previously served as senior researcher at the LABORatorio Revelli (Torino), the Institute for Social and Economic Research (Essex), internal consultant at the World Bank and external consultant for the Italian Commission on Poverty and Social Exclusion, the International Labour Organization, ISFOL and NERA. He received a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Essex. His main areas of research are in labor economics, income distribution and poverty, and applied microeconometrics.

He joined IZA as a Research Fellow in January 2013.
  Email | CV | Homepage
 
IZA Discussion Papers:
No. Author(s)
Title
10904  Fabio Berton
Francesco Devicienti
Sara Grubanov-Boskovic
Employment Protection Legislation and Mismatch: Evidence from a Reform
10314  Francesco Devicienti
Elena Grinza
Alessandro Manello
Davide Vannoni
Which Are the Benefits of Having More Female Leaders? Evidence from the Use of Part-Time Work in Italy
10293  Francesco Devicienti
Bernardo Fanfani
Agata Maida
Collective Bargaining and the Evolution of Wage Inequality in Italy
10292  Francesco Devicienti
Alessandro Manello
Davide Vannoni
Technical Efficiency, Unions and Decentralized Labor Contracts
9463  Francesco Devicienti
Elena Grinza
Davide Vannoni
The Impact of Part-Time Work on Firm Total Factor Productivity: Evidence from Italy
9411  Cristian Bartolucci
Francesco Devicienti
Ignacio Monzón
Identifying Sorting in Practice
9410  Francesco Devicienti
Paolo Naticchioni
Andrea Ricci
Temporary Employment, Demand Volatility and Unions: Firm-Level Evidence
(forthcoming in Industrial and Labor Relation Review)
7601  Cristian Bartolucci
Francesco Devicienti
Better Workers Move to Better Firms: A Simple Test to Identify Sorting
6086  David Card
Francesco Devicienti
Agata Maida
Rent-Sharing, Hold-up, and Wages: Evidence from Matched Panel Data
(published in The Review of Economic Studies, 2014, 81(1).)
 

Back

Login