Karen van der Wiel
Research Fellow

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van der Wiel Karen van der Wiel currently works for CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis in The Hague, where she is responsible for all research on education (program manager education).

She obtained a PhD from the department of econometrics at Tilburg University, The Netherlands, in December 2009. Before that, Karen received an Msc in economics from Erasmus University Rotterdam in 2005 (cum laude). In 2008, Karen spent a semester at University College London.

Her research interests include applied microeconometrics, the economics of education, labor economics and experimental economics.

Karen joined IZA as a Research Affiliate in May 2007 and became an IZA Research Fellow in January 2013.
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IZA Discussion Papers:
No. Author(s)
Title
10885  Wiljan Van den Berge
Egbert L. W. Jongen
Karen van der Wiel
Using Tax Deductions to Promote Lifelong Learning: Real and Shifting Responses
4984  Pierre Koning
Karen van der Wiel
Ranking the Schools: How Quality Information Affects School Choice in the Netherlands
(revised version published in: Journal of the European Economic Association, 2013, 11 (2), 466493)
4969  Pierre Koning
Karen van der Wiel
School Responsiveness to Quality Rankings: An Empirical Analysis of Secondary Education in the Netherlands
(revised version published in: De Economist, 2012, 160 (4), 339-355)
4465  Karen van der Wiel
Better Protected, Better Paid: Evidence on How Employment Protection Affects Wages
(published in: Labour Economics, 2010, 17 (1), 16-26)
4272  Jan Boone
Karen van der Wiel
Frederic Vermeulen
Kinky Choices, Dictators and Split Might: A Non-Cooperative Model for Household Consumption and Labor Supply
(published in IZA Journal of Labor Economics, 2014, 3 (11).)
4064  Karen van der Wiel
Have You Heard the News? How Real-Life Expectations React to Publicity
3623  Karen van der Wiel
Preparing for Policy Changes: Social Security Expectations and Pension Scheme Participation
3352  Karen van der Wiel
Better Protected, Better Paid: Evidence on How Employment Protection Affects Wages
(substantially revised version published as IZA DP No. 4465)
 

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